Stay connected with Tech!

Technology has enabled us to connect with our friends and family down the street or on the other side of the globe, we send text messages, photos, videos and even broadcast ourselves live to each other.  Waiting for weeks or even months to receive a letter has been replaced with a wave and smile in near realtime.

My daughter might only be four years old, but she has four years of technology experience with iPhones and iPads. Those four years has allowed me to be a bigger part of her life, despite the distance away from me that she lives today.  I pick her up from pre-school every other week for the weekend, but every other night we depend on technology to connect us.

Earlier tonight I was waiting for a train in Penn Station (New York City), more than three hours away.  Yet, she was there with me, walking around and exploring the Amtrak terminal.  We were using Apple FaceTime, a video conferencing tool, which allowed her to get a personal tour of the terminal, and yes the big arrival/departure sign that I had to keep going back too.

Most nights our talks are one or two minutes where I ask how pre-school was, and we end with a “night night, love you”.  Tonight I could see the look of amazement on her face as she had me pan the phone in circles so she could see more, and best of all it ended with the normal “night night, love you”, but with an added kiss that was blown my way via technology. 

Today’s world may drive more and more families and loved ones further and further apart in distance, but with technology you can still be right there.  There are already challenges in raising a daughter, if the parents are together or not.  With support from both parents and accepting technology everyone is connected, if its 15 minutes, 45 minutes, 3 hours or 10+ hours apart.

Add a comment Add a comment

Last Updated on Sunday, 07 April 2013 21:04

Hits: 1991

Register your kid's domain name!

Do you have a personal domain name?

Have you considered registering a domain name for your child or even looked at domain names when naming your child?

This isn't a new concept, in fact ‘Parents buy domain names for babies’ hit USA Today back in 2007.  We can fast forward to the end of 2012 and there were more than 100 million .com domain names already registered, according to pingdom.com.  So it’s only getting harder to find that right domain name.

I read the article ‘Why everyone should register a domain name’ earlier today by Dan Gillmore who teaches and currently gives extra credit for his students that register their personal domain names.

That got me thinking about the domain AddisonLouise.com that I registered for my daughter, and she is only four.  In reality she won’t need her own domain name for ten plus years, but Addison Davis is a common name, much like my own.  

So, I secured her web identity for the future today, and as she builds her identity and eventually her web identity we are already a couple steps ahead.

Today it is not uncommon for children under the required age of thirteen to have social media accounts, in fact Mark Zuckerberg has stated he would challenge the age limit “at some point”.  So with each year that passes the internet and technology is reaching younger and younger children.

By registering her domain name, I can help educate her on the internet and how what is posted online is posted for everyone even if not intended.  It also puts me in a position that if she does make a mistake I am able to do some damage control and by using search engine optimization I may be able to reduce its long-term effect.

Buying a domain name for yourself or your kids isn't for everyone, as there is cost and some technical skill set required to put it together, but it is something you should consider.

Add a comment Add a comment

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 March 2013 22:06

Hits: 3015

Facebook cover photos versus timeline sharing

Sharing photos on Facebook is a great way to keep your family and friends updated on your latest adventures, achievements and of course your kids.  Recently I broke down the basics of Online Photo Sharing on Digital Daddy, but today I want to go into some more detail of something I see, probably way too often.

Photo sharing on Facebook is not created equally when it comes down to limiting who can or can not view the photo.  

The primary methods of posting photos are on the timeline or in a photo album, both of which allow you to set the security permissions and only allow your family to see that cute baby bathtub photo.

Many of us out there are using the cover photo or profile photo to highlight those moments as its front and center when someone loads your profile.  But, both only have one security permission and its public.

fbook-profilephoto

What exactly does public mean?  Well say I am not your friend on Facebook, but while searching for a friend whose name is close to yours I can view your profile page including that profile and cover photo, despite how you have security settings set for other parts of your profile.

There is some very basic security here, where someone not logged into Facebook cannot load your profile until they login, but if you are allowing search engines to link to your timeline, your cover photo and profile may be searchable by anyone anywhere.

So really think about this, that cute baby bathtub photo highlighted in my cover photo can be viewed, downloaded, re-shared or even uploaded on a different site.  That same photo placed in the timeline or a photo album can be controlled and set limiting access to only those you want and trust to see it.

Share your photos smart, and always remember once its online it is online and there is no guarantee you won’t see it again in a few years on the internet.

Add a comment Add a comment

Last Updated on Monday, 25 March 2013 23:22

Hits: 2350

Off the Pad, Goldie Blox

Last November I was like every other father looking for Christmas gift ideas, that is when my girlfriend shared a link with me from Upworthy.com ‘Move over, Barbie - You’re Obsolete’.  The article was about Debbie, a female in the male-dominated world of engineering, who decided to to introduce little girls everywhere to engineering with a toy (Goldie Blox).

I watched the video and was sold, despite my daughter being four and its recommended age of six years plus.

I pre-ordered and knew someday in March it would show up (no longer a Christmas gift).  I hoped it would show up on a weekend I had my daughter, but at that point who knew.

Fast forward to today, after swimming with friends we got home to the Goldie Blox sitting at the front door.  After dinner we opened it up and started playing following the included book.

goldieblox1

The book first introduced us to the tools included, the friends and what our objective is - to allow the friends to spin like a ballerina.  To do this we read on and Goldie took us step-by-step in spinning one, two and then all five included friends.

Now my daughter is still four, so I wasn't sure how she would do.  I will say with my help she did a lot better than I would have guessed during this part.

But after finishing the first part of the book, you flip it and it start the second half which is just pictures and you match the pictures to make it work.  This is where my daughter’s patience was tested and she had trouble positioning the pieces.

In seeing my daughter, I think if the peg holes where labeled with a symbol system or even if the book had the picture of the star to match the peg board it would have given her a visual to compare and she might have done better.  But for now she is still four and is playing with a toy designed for six year olds, so I’ll take what I can get.

After seeing her get frustrated, I switched gears and asked her if she wanted to build something herself.  She did, and I let her build on her own, even if the end result didn’t make any of the friends spin.  She had a good time, and when it was time to put it away, she didn’t want to quit playing.

goldieblox3

So if you are a father and you have a little girl, check out the link on upworthy.com, or visit Goldie Blox directly.  I would recommend making the pre-order based on my daughter’s first impression alone.

Add a comment Add a comment

Last Updated on Sunday, 17 March 2013 21:23

Hits: 2242

Online Photo Sharing

The clocks have sprung forward and the weather is warming up.  As more of us are spending more time outdoors we also find ourselves taking more photos as our kids rediscover the outside world.  When we take more photos we want to share more photos, so how should we share them?

First let’s take a minute and review the basis of Facebook Security, every one of your friends should fit into one of the categories of Friends, Acquaintances or Restricted.  Your trusted friends and family in Friends, co-workers and connections in acquaintances and well Restricted is for those you don’t want to share your online life with.

Now when I post a photo of my daughter and I want to share it with my family and friends I use Facebook.  I recommend sharing with the Friends except Acquaintances, this is sharing the photo with my connections in the Friends group only.  For me the majority of my co-workers and acquaintances don’t need to see my daughter at the playground.

I do not share my family photos on Twitter, Foursquare or even Instagram.

Twitter is all public, if you share the photo everyone can see it, download it and re-share it if they want.

Foursquare is a social location sharing tool and photos should be of the establishment and not of your family there.

Instagram is now owned by Facebook and is used to apply filters to photos.  When you post a photo on Instagram you share it publicly on the Instagram site and you have the option to share it on Twitter and Facebook as well.

Sharing photos of your kids online can be safe when you do it right.  Now before you upload that photo think that once it’s online, there is a chance it will always be online.  So always think before you share that swimsuit photo.

Add a comment Add a comment

Last Updated on Sunday, 17 March 2013 21:27

Hits: 2095

All Rights Reserved

(c) 1982-2014 Scott R. Davis